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GREEN GENERATION: MILLENNIALS SAY SUSTAINABILITY IS A SHOPPING PRIORITY

07 Apr 2019
Despite the fact that Millennials are coming of age in one of the most difficult economic climates in the past 100 years, a recent Nielsen global online study found that they continue to be most willing to pay extra for sustainable offerings—almost three-out-of-four respondents in the latest findings, up from approximately half in 2014. The rise in the percentage of respondents aged 15 - 20, also known as Generation Z, who are willing to pay more for products and services that come from companies who are committed to positive social and environmental impact was also strong—up from 55% in 2014 to 72% in 2015. read more

Charging at High and Low Temperatures

11 May 2018
Learn how to extend battery life by moderating ambient temperatures. Batteries operate over a wide temperature range, but this does not give permission to also charge them at these conditions. The charging process is more delicate than discharging and special care must be taken. Extreme cold and high heat reduce charge acceptance, so the battery must be brought to a moderate temperature before charging. Older battery technologies, such as lead acid and NiCd, have higher charging tolerances than newer systems. This allows them to charge below freezing but at a reduced charge C-rate. When it comes to cold-charging NiCd is hardier than NiMH. Table 1 summarizes the permissible charge and discharge temperatures of common rechargeable batteries. The table excludes specialty batteries that are designed to charge outside these parameters.   read more

The Parent’s Guide to Filling Out the FAFSA® Form

04 Aug 2017
While the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA®) form is the student’s application, we know that parents often play a large role in the process. After all, students who are considered dependent have to provide parental information on the FAFSA form anyway and must have a parent sign it. While we recommend that the student start his or her own FAFSA form, we know that’s not always what happens. With that in mind, we wanted to provide instructions for parents who are starting the FAFSA form on behalf of their child so you can avoid running into issues completing the form. read more

Criminal Justice Fact Sheet

10 Jul 2017
Incarceration Trends in America read more

Buying Research Paper

27 Apr 2017
Having to do one more writing task is probably the news that causes the most stress to college students. Whenever writing becomes drudgery instead of a fulfilling learning experience, you know it’s time for a smart alternative. In moments of academic stress, buying research paper can be the most efficient way to regain control. read more

Psychology Research Paper Topics Ideas for Your Next Assignment

15 Jan 2017
Updated Aug 2021 read more

Sexual Harassment and Sexual Assault under Title IX

07 Oct 2016
Title IX of the Education Amendments of 1972 is a comprehensive federal law that prohibits sex discrimination in education. It covers women and men, girls and boys, and staff and students in any educational institution or program that receives federal funds. Local school districts, colleges and universities, for-profit schools, career and technical education agencies, libraries, and museums are all covered under Title IX. read more

Immigration Terms and Definitions Involving Aliens

16 Aug 2016
A general summary of U.S. immigration terminology follows. Any references below to USCIS refer to the United States Citizenship and Immigration Services. read more

12 Common FAFSA® Mistakes

05 Aug 2016
I hear all kinds of reasons: “The FAFSA form is too hard.” “It takes too long to complete.” “I’ll never qualify anyway, so why does it matter?” It does matter. For one, contrary to popular belief, there is no income “cut-off” when it comes to federal student aid. Also, the FAFSA form is not just the application for federal grants such as the Federal Pell Grant, it’s also the application for Federal Work-Study funds, federal student loans, and even scholarships and grants offered by your state, school, or private organization. If you don’t complete the FAFSA form, you could lose out on thousands of dollars to help you pay for college. It takes little time to complete, and there are “Help and Hints” provided throughout the application. read more

Keeping Your Child Safe on the Internet

20 Jul 2016
As with the real world, the Internet has its seamy side  — and it’s all too easy for kids to stray into it. Click-click and a Peter Cottontail fan’s search for “bunnies” turns up raunchy pictures of women wearing fuzzy white ears and not much else. Porn, questionable characters, hate groups, and misinformation flourish online. To preserve the best of what’s online for your kids and avoid the garbage:1. Step into their cyberworld “Parents have to get involved. Just as they know every detail of the playground around the corner  — the jungle gym, the swings  — they need to know their kids’ online playground as well,” says Tim Lordan, staff director of the Internet Education Foundation, a nonprofit group that produces the online safety guide GetNetWise. It may be hard to keep your eyes open after visiting what seems like the 100th website devoted to Barbie, but playing copilot to your child is the best way to make sure she gets a smooth ride. By the time she’s 7, you won’t need to be glued to her side, but you should be somewhere in the room or checking infrequently.2. Set house rules Decide how much time you’re comfortable with your children being online and which sites they may go to. You might post a short list or even a signed contract (like the free ones at www.SafeKids.com) next to the computer. So there’s no confusion, talk about the rules  — and the consequences for breaking them. “Our house rules say the kids are allowed half an hour of computer time on ‘their days.’ One child has Mondays and Wednesdays, and the other has Tuesdays and Thursdays. Then they get one hour each on the weekend,” says Jamie Smith of Mount Pleasant, Michigan, mom of Hailey, 12, and Kody, 9. “They have certain sites they can visit without special permission. Any others have to be approved by me or my husband.”3. Teach them to protect their privacy While they won’t fully understand the consequences of revealing personal information online, you should still make sure your children know: * never to give their name, phone number, e-mail address, password, postal address, school, or picture without your permission * not to open e-mail from people they don’t know * not to respond to hurtful or disturbing messages * not to get together with anyone they “meet” online. Parenting contributing editor Anne Reeks writes a family computing column for the Houston Chronicle. read more

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